Review: Tipping the Velvet by Sarah Waters

56373It’s no Fingersmith. I have to admit, had this been the first book I picked up by Sarah Waters, I would have never returned. Which is important to note because for a long time I was reluctant to pick up Fingersmith, thinking I should read Tipping the Velvet first. I thought I would enjoy it more because of the theatre aspect.

Boy was I so, so wrong.

The story sounds interesting enough: young Nancy, an poor oyster girl, falls in love with a girl on the stage, Kitty Butler, who dresses like a gentleman and ends up following her to London as her dresser. As the two live and work together they slowly become lovers in every sense of the word. Nancy begins to work on the stage alongside Kitty and has a quick rise to stardom, then a rapid descent to to rock bottom where she makes supremely bad decisions, all the way up to the end.

Having read Fingersmith first I was expected a more detailed, complex plot and this disappoints in that aspect. This one was just not as tightly woven–Fingersmith featured plots within plots within plots (and it was glorious). Though I do love the detail of the ending being wrapped up a brief one time introduction earlier in the book. The writing style is still beautifully crafted, this after all, is Sarah Waters. But her amazing prose isn’t enough to give this more than three stars.

Oh yeah, and it’s definitely erotic.

I have The Paying Guests to read next by her, but honestly after this dud I’m a little reluctant for some more Sarah Waters so soon.

★★★☆☆

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Review: Beauvallet by Georgette Heyer

311156Now this is a swashbuckler to make your heart race! Notorious pirate Nicholas Beauvallet is haunting the waters of Spain, plundering and sinking any ships that come across his path. It’s this way that he meets Dona Dominica and her ailing father. He leaves the two in Spain, but not before giving Dominica a promise–a promise to infiltrate Spain and bring her back to England, regardless of the fact if caught he would certainly be put to death.

I love this book so much and I can’t believe that I waited this long to read this Heyer book! I have mostly read her Georgian and Regency era books (though I’m nearing the end of my read through of her historical works…) and I guess I was a little wary to branch out. Worried that it wouldn’t seem like a Heyer novel, or be as good. I was wrong on all accounts and I’m so glad I was. I can’t express enough love for this book, and I can’t wait to include it in my regular rotation of Heyer re-reads.

What I have left to read of Heyer: An Infamous Army, The Spanish Bride, The Great Roxhythe, Simon the Coldheart, The Conqueror, Royal Escape and My Lord John.

★★★★★